Stories of Migration - Artwork Details

Art by: B.J. Adams, Margaret Abramshe, Bobbi Baugh, Nancy Bardach, and Susan Else
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Stranger in a Strange Land Stranger in a Strange Land
Margaret Abramshe   •  Mesquite, Nevada, USA More Info
The image is of my paternal grandfather. He is prepared for travel, with his heavy wool overcoat and his best hat. My grandfather was like most Americans who fled oppression and economic hardship. He was one of millions of immigrants who traveled here to a better life. This quilt is my prayer for every stranger who is forced to leave a place of familiarity. My hope is that ▶
Connecting Connecting
B. J. Adams   •  Washington, D.C., USA More Info
From the earliest marks on cave walls, through creating letters and alphabets, to forming words, to printing books, the inherent differences in people and their diverse languages have hindered communication. However, we can also connect in nonverbal ways. The movement of groups of people, whether refugees or migrants, offers us the greatest opportunity to communicate if we ▶
Ad Infinitum Ad Infinitum
Nancy Bardach   •  Berkeley, California, USA More Info
Past, present, and future tents — the interrupted lives of migrant refugees. Somber colors and dark surroundings reflect dire conditions. Relatively more colorful doorways and people lingering beyond open flaps suggest the continuing light and hope within.
Implosion 4 Implosion 4
Beth Barron   •  Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA More Info
This is the 4th in a series of mandalas. After literally being locked out of my home, I did not know where to go. Using found band aids, symbolic of wounding and resilience, I looked within to find the center (the heart) I had lost. I stitched together my life, a new story, a stronger map to lead me on my next journey towards home.
How Can We Sing In a Strange Land? How Can We Sing In a Strange Land?
Bobbi R. Baugh   •  DeLand, Florida, USA More Info
The mournful lament of the Jews captured and taken from their ancestral homeland in the 6th Century BCE is heard in Psalm 137: “How can we sing the Lord’s Song in a strange land?” They were bereft. They had left behind their home and, they believed, their God. This intense longing for home is woven into the story and history of the Jewish people. And yet, ▶
Blood Line Blood Line
Alice Beasley   •  Oakland, California, USA More Info
Through the metaphor of a train (a vehicle that moves inexorably through time, picking up people in one place and depositing them in another), this triptych tells the story of the passage of my ancestors from freedom to slavery and into the present: a journey that inevitably ends in me, an observer of my own past, recording the scene on my cell phone. By using the faces of ▶
Boat Travelers Boat Travelers
Robert H. Bein   •  Longmont, Colorado, USA More Info
Alone in a boat in the sea.
Sedna`s Tears Sedna`s Tears
Charlotte S. Bird   •  San Diego, California, USA More Info
Sedna, sea goddess of the Inuit, cries for the progressing diaspora of her people. She sees their houses fall into the ocean. They move their villages, but the ice goes north, making them traverse wider, rougher seas to hunt. Orcas invade and disperse their traditional prey. The white bear comes ashore, hungry. The brown bear and the advancing forest confront him.  
Horizon Horizon
Betty Busby   •  Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA More Info
The ebb and flow of human migration since the dawn of history is like a river. In many ways it can be shaped by natural forces or diverted by human intervention. Entire cultures can move gradually or be compelled to flee from deadly forces. This video of changing colors on silk is meant to evoke that force of change.  
Detained Denied Displaced Detained Denied Displaced
Gloria S. Daly   •  Duncan, British Columbia, Canada More Info
During WWII, the Japanese people living in coastal British Columbia were forcibly moved inland to Japanese Canadian internment camps: cold, unfamiliar places where families were separated, mothers were lost, and possessions disappeared. Despite this, these displaced people formed communities and survived. My practice explores meditative hand stitching/mark making. Each ▶
Receptacles of Memory Receptacles of Memory
Jane E. Dunnewold   •  San Antonio, Texas, USA More Info
A reworked quilt is a symbol of transition and paradox. Once soft and meant for a bed, it is now stiff and scratchy, transformed into a sort of landscape, across which thoughts, fears, and memories traverse. The quilts of those on the move function as “receptacles of memory” for these people who are launching into a world that could at best be characterized as ▶
Crossing Points Crossing Points
Susan Else   •  Santa Cruz, California, USA More Info
This piece started with a metaphor: some areas of the world seem to be intractable knots in the fabric of our common humanity. Decades of injury and counter-injury pull the snarl tighter, and outside interests add to the tangle with arms and support for warring factions. Eventually, individuals caught up in the web have nothing to lose by leaving: there is no future for ▶
Coming: A Telling Series Coming: A Telling Series
Linda Filby-Fisher   •  Overland Park, Kansas, USA More Info
YOU CAME. VENUTO. WITH LONELINESS IN YOUR POCKET AND ITALY ON YOUR TONGUE. SILENZIOSO. 
Bundles Bundles
Cheryl Gerhart   •  Churchville, Virginia, USA More Info
In some areas of North America in the 16th and 17th centuries, Native Americans kept a summer camp and a winter camp, migrating between them, carrying their medicines and supplies bundled on large willow brancheschosen for their strength and flexibility. Each bundle was carried by two people, one end on the shoulder of each. As Europeans settled North America, the Native ▶
Crossings II Crossings II
Sandy Gregg   •  Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA More Info
People leave their home countries and cross borders for many reasons. This piece highlights some of those reasons, crossed by the paths of those who are on the move.
Last Hope California Last Hope California
Ginnie Hebert   •  Puyallup, Washington, USA More Info
When I first learned of the diaspora exhibit, many movements of people came to mind. But what lodged in my brain and wouldn’t let go was the great migration of souls who left the Great Plains during the Dust Bowl. This piece represents the relentless dust storms that forced many people to leave their beloved farmland and head west in the hopes of reconstructing a new ▶
Tagged Tagged
Patricia Kennedy-Zafred   •  Murrysville, Pennsylvania, USA More Info
As a storyteller, my goal is to create thought-provoking narratives to develop a visual dialogue with the viewer. The interpretation of each piece is conceived through the lens of individual experiences, memories, or perspectives. Barely three months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, forcing into internment ▶
Babylon Babylon
Brigitte Kopp   •  Kasel-Golzig, Germany More Info
This installation is based on the biblical story of Babylon, that we once were all brothers and sisters speaking the same language. The text on the quilt on the floor says in different languages: “We all are sisters and brothers”. 
Home is Where the Army Sends Us Home is Where the Army Sends Us
Kristin La Flamme   •  Portland, Oregon, USA More Info
For twenty years I’ve considered our family to be urban nomads. We’ve moved every few years (almost always across an ocean) at the behest of the U.S. Army. Each “Permanent Change of Station” means we must adjust to a new home, geographic environment, culture, and often language. Setting down roots is difficult, but we always seem to make connections ▶
Defining Moments 7: Fleeing the City Defining Moments 7: Fleeing the City
Carol A. Larson   •  Petaluma, California, USA More Info
Post WWII, there began a mass migration from urban to suburban. In 1952 my parents moved their young family from downtown San Francisco to the suburbs. Decades later I asked my aged father about this, and he said, “We moved to the suburbs so you wouldn’t have to go to school with the ‘colored’ children.” This piece is part of a collaborative ▶
Wailing Wall of Krakow Wailing Wall of Krakow
Sandra E. Lauterbach   •  Los Angeles, California, USA More Info
This piece was inspired by my visit to Remuh Cemetery in Krakow, Poland, where my family lived before WW2. The tombstones were destroyed during the war. In the 1950s, tombstone fragments were recovered and cobbled together to form a wall around the cemetery — a poignant memorial. The photographs I took of the wall and family wartime documents are interwoven into a ▶
MOGADISHU MOGADISHU
Joy Nebo Lavrencik   •  Oak Brook, Illinois, USA More Info
As I began to research Somalia, I realized how tragic life can be in this part of the world: famine, combat victims, genital cutting, rape, and death. I chose feet to humanize an artistic abstraction. This work represents people who have no shoes. Their feet show and tell the story of a different life. The materials in my piece represent the fragility of life: hog gut, ▶
Only 8 1/2 of Many Millions Only 8 1/2 of Many Millions
Nancy Lemke   •  Bonita, California, USA More Info
I live near San Diego where stories regarding Hispanic immigrants swirl daily. One particularly struck my heart: the attack on three busloads of immigrant children by local adults. I was overwhelmed by how many people from hugely varying groups have moved from place to place, forced or choosing to find safer homes with more opportunity. In fact, I was drowning in the ▶
Cotton, Triangular Trade Cotton, Triangular Trade
Susan Lenz   •  Columbia, South Carolina, USA More Info
The need for slaves, crops, and manufactured goods displaced millions during the 16th through 19th centuries. Coming from South Carolina, I am very aware that the humble cotton boll represents this sad part of history.
Archeology #24, A Time to Rest Archeology #24, A Time to Rest
Kevan Lunney   •  East Brunswick, New Jersey, USA More Info
The giant spiral ending in a central fireball speaks to the many forces in our lives and also to the motion of the globe and its inhabitants. The blocks of text reference shared wisdom. Words appear in stitch across the distressed surface. Look for them: Do what you can, there is a time to rest, and we are all afraid.
The Past as Road to Tomorrow The Past as Road to Tomorrow
Penny Mateer   •  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA More Info
As the U.S. questions its immigration policies while forgetting how the country was founded, humanitarian crisis grows in Europe as thousands flee war and oppression, risking death and enduring incredible hardships in search of safety and security. Newspaper photojournalists tell their desperate stories, but I am concerned that the visual impact of their work is diminished ▶
Out of Africa: Primal Diaspora Out of Africa: Primal Diaspora
Buff McAllister   •  Youngsville, New York, USA More Info
Humans arose and evolved in Africa. Their gradual migration and dispersal all across the earth was the first diaspora. My piece starts with the primary colors, then adds the secondary and tertiary colors to represent the vast diversity of humanity that now exists on earth — different cultures, languages, colors, customs, but allconnected in a direct line to our origins.
Connecting Threads Connecting Threads
Denise Oyama Miller   •  Fremont, California, USA More Info
Connecting Threads tells my family’s migration story from Japan to America. The story starts with my grandparents Zengoro and Chiyo, who separately traveled to Hawaii, met, married and moved to Los Angeles. With the untimely loss of Zengoro, Chiyo raised her four children by running a family store. The family store and home were lost as a result of the World War II ▶
Sky Prayers - Memory of Sky Sky Prayers - Memory of Sky
Melody Money   •  Boulder, Colorado, USA More Info
This piece was inspired by the people from Tibet now living in exile. Home to them is a distant memory. Many have fled this country of high clouds and mountains, their home on the roof of the world. This piece is a mind’s eye view of a remembered home. It recalls a memory of the light on the mountains, the feel of the wind, a perception of the sky. This is a life ▶
Tutsi Testimony Tutsi Testimony
Bonnie Peterson   •  Houghton, Michigan, USA More Info
An estimated two million people fled Rwanda to huge refugee camps in Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) and Tanzania, where there was no protection against conflict. Some returned to Rwanda and others left for Europe, Canada, and the U.S. In this work, testimony from survivors of the Rwandan Genocide is embroidered on two long ribbons.
In/Visible In/Visible
Sara P. Rockinger   •  Lafayette, Colorado, USA More Info
As a fiber artist, I layer thread, fabric, form, and imagery to create socially relevant figurative work. I am interested in how global social issues and daily life intersect, overlap, and become stitched together through shared human experience. This stems from my need to understand what it might be like to be someone else. How and where does my life intersect with someone ▶
This Land This Land
Sara P. Rockinger   •  Lafayette, Colorado, USA More Info
As a fiber artist, I am interested in overlapping sheer layers of thread, fabric, color, and content to uncover the relationship between the layers, mimicking overlapping lives and experiences. I love the contribution a single thread line can make, linking the edge of a figure in one layer with the beginning of an individual journey in another. This Land depicts the ▶
Generation 2500 Generation 2500
Barbara J. Schneider   •   Woodstock, Illinois, USA More Info
Generation 2500 was inspired by “To Walk the World,” an article by journalist Paul Salopek for National Geographic magazine. He has embarked on a sevenyear global trek from Africa to Tierra Del Fuego, following the migration of our Homo sapiens ancestors. In 2500 generations, they spread from Africa to the most remote parts of the earth. I wanted to depict the ▶
Displacement Displacement
Maya Schonenberger   •  Miami, Florida, USA More Info
The definition of “Internally Displaced” according to UNESCO: people who are forced to flee their homes, often for the very same reasons as refugees from war, civil conflict, political strife, and gross human rights abuse, but who remain within their own country and do not cross an international border. They are not eligible for protection under the same ▶
Swept Into Eternity Swept Into Eternity
Sandra Sider   •  Bronx, New York, USA More Info
As members of the Cherokee nation were forced by the U.S. government to walk the hellish Trail of Tears in the 1830s from their lands in the east to Oklahoma, many hundreds died along the way, including children. In the words of Lucy Ames Butler, a Presbyterian missionary and wife of a minister who supported the Cherokee and traveled with them, these souls were “swept ▶
Birds Birds
Ginny Smith   •  Arlington, Virginia, USA More Info
Magical birds can be remembered by conventional means. The book Birds is descriptive of those fleeing disaster. Gone, they will be shrouded by the Garden, never to be seen.
On the Path On the Path
Daniela Tiger   •  Toronto, Ontario, Canada More Info
My people have been forced to leave their ancestral homelands for as long as history has been recorded. Moving towards an uncertain destiny as the story is written, without more than crackers in their pockets. In my work, I am attempting to create a narrative of a people on the move, some tired, some drained of all energy. And yet, some remain hopeful, searching into the ▶
Children Are Not Criminals Children Are Not Criminals
Susan Wei   •  Ashland, New Hampshire, USA More Info
Unaccompanied children from Central America streamed across the border into the United States. They endured hunger, violence, and hardships as they made this trip. While they waited for their status to be determined, they were herded into army barracks, put on buses, housed in dog kennels, and made to feel very unwelcome. This was shameful and inhumane. This piece is to ▶
Navigating a Broken World Navigating a Broken World
Shea Wilkinson   •  Omaha, Nebraska, USA More Info
This piece depicts the global history of diaspora. The knots represent the migrations of people from every land, showing that all peoples originally came from somewhere else, and that migration was the way of life for so many millennia. The shape of my piece is based on Buckminster Fuller’s cuboctahedron map projection because I wanted to show a world without a ▶


 

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