Concrete & Grassland - Artwork Details

Art by: jo p griffith, Aurelle S. Locke, Kathy York, Carolyn Villars, and Janis L. Doucette
Concrete and Grassland

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Selected Artists and Works Click any image to view full-screen.

Cenchrus enchinatus Cenchrus enchinatus
Naomi S. Adams   •  Pocatello, Idaho, USA More Info
I am fascinated by the way we constantly adapt to change and are continually reconfigured by our experiences and influences from the world around us. For this piece, I used shibori processes, dye baths, paint, and thread to layer an abstract landscape obscured by grass burs. I recently moved from concrete to grassland in the rural west, and the layers of landscape are still ▶
City Love Affair 2 City Love Affair 2
Natalya Aikens   •  Pleasantville, New York, USA More Info
The core of my art is deeply rooted in my Russian heritage and the architectural imagery of St. Petersburg and New York City, coupled with the use of recycled materials such as paper, plastics, and vintage fabrics. 
Electric Fields Electric Fields
Elizabeth Barton   •  Athens, Georgia, USA More Info
Industrial architecture has beauty...but so often the environment suffers. These are the cooling towers at Ferrybridge Power Station in the UK as seen from a train across the fields. 
Rising #23 - East River Winter Dusk Rising #23 - East River Winter Dusk
Allegra Brelsford   •  New York, New York, USA More Info
SOLD Rising is about the structures we build and what comes back in return—from nature or human interaction with the natural environment. I look out onto New York City’s East River at the end of the day and see the western light reflecting on water, windows, and buildings. 
NYC Subway NYC Subway
Donna Brennan   •  El Dorado Hills, California, USA More Info
NFSI spent a lot of time on the subway in the 1980s when Keith Haring’s drawings joined the usual graffiti. I researched Haring’s work and then drafted my own version. As far as I know, he didn’t do a person dancing on top of a dog. 
`Are We Too Late?` Bird Series #3, The Mallee Emu-wren `Are We Too Late?` Bird Series #3, The Mallee Emu-wren
Kathy Brown   •  Modbury, South Australia, Australia More Info
NFSFar away, in the beautiful and dry landscape of the Mallee scrub in southeastern Australia, you might be blessed with the sight of a Mallee Emu-wren, a tiny bird weighing less than 6 grams. They live in this grassland of spinifex grass and mallee trees, where the grasses can grow up to 3 feet in height. Reduced funding and inappropriate fire regimes threaten many endangered ▶
Still Standing Still Standing
JoAnn Camp   •  Greenville, Georgia, USA More Info
This tree has seen many winters. It is bent and scarred—no leaves remain. But it is still standing.
The Country The Country
Sharon Casey   •  Bakersfield, California, USA More Info
The Country is an abstract image of a corral with a grassy hill in the background. It is sparse, containing only the corral and the hill behind it. All it needs now is for a horse to wander into the scene and begin grazing.  
Olentangy 2 Olentangy 2
Georgie Cline   •  Columbus, Ohio, USA More Info
NFSOn any given day, nature can be a beautiful flower or fallen trees. Water that is blue one day is brown and mucky on another. The change of seasons gives a completely new look to the same area. And then people come along. As the cement barriers in the piece were used to add artwork in the form of graffiti, somehow people and nature have come together and become one. 
Lust for Life Lust for Life
Maryte Collard   •  Siauliai, Lithuania More Info
The lust for life of a modest dandelion flower breaking through the concrete of city pavement.
Celebrating our Communities Celebrating our Communities
Elizabeth Davison   •  Washington, D.C., USA More Info
This is my concept of the uniquely American metropolis. It spans the rural farmhouse to the downtown of the city, as well as the suburbs and parkland in between. As an urban planner, I have studied the city and its growth over many decades, and I wanted to capture the relationships and essence of each part of our metropolitan areas. This is no city in particular, but ▶
Dancing in the city Dancing in the city
Christel De Vrij   •  Schoten, Antwerp, Belgium More Info
At first sight, a big city may look dull, grey, cold, and straight, but in its apartments are children … being children! They are having fun, dancing, moving, and acting crazy. The knowledge of this contrast gives me a warm feeling.
All`s One Under The Sun 2 All`s One Under The Sun 2
Janis Doucette   •  North Reading, Massachusetts, USA More Info
The natural world is phenomenal and so much of the manmade world — our architecture, our cities — is a stunning accomplishment. They exist hand in hand in both beautiful expressions and disastrous and ugly manifestations, but are elementally joined together. Just as the disparate photos hold together as a whole, they seem to merge naturally with my snow-dyed ▶
The Grasslands Are Winning The Grasslands Are Winning
Aileyn Renli Ecob   •   Walnut Creek, California, USA More Info
Man imposes his will on nature, but nature works unceasingly to reclaim its own.
Aurora Aurora
Mita Giacomini   •  Dundas, Ontario, Canada More Info
This piece is one of a series contemplating the paths at our feet—how subtle and fleeting patterns on the ground convey an expansive feeling of place. Aurora is inspired by the shadows that late summer grasses and wildflowers cast on a paved seashore road.
Central Park Central Park
Lynne Goulette   •  Grants Pass, Oregon, USA More Info
Where else is the juxtaposition between urban and rural more evident than in New York City’s Central Park? There are ponds, lakes, trees, and green amid the skyscrapers. Based on the many photos I took when visiting, this is my mind’s eye view of the park.
Camas Prairie, Idaho Camas Prairie, Idaho
Terry Grant   •  Beaverton, Oregon, USA More Info
A cross-country road trip took us across the United States. Watching the transition from farmland to city, from mountains to desert, from forest to prairie, gave me a new understanding of the land. Idaho’s Camas Prairie was like an inland sea of gentle waves and swells.
Route 56 in Limbo Route 56 in Limbo
jo p griffith   •  Del Mar, California, USA More Info
A much needed freeway sat unusable for about 10 years because of political and financial wrangling, hence there are no vehicles on this concrete overpass.
Delta Flight 4770 from Calgary Delta Flight 4770 from Calgary
Karen Hansen   •  Overland Park, Kansas, USA More Info
Center-pivot irrigation systems create unique designs as they alter the face of the prairie. On a flight over western Kansas and Nebraska, I noted their imprint on the land. Years of pumping water from the Ogallala Aquifer has drastically depleted it, and I wonder how much longer it will be possible to continue this method of farming. 
From Coast to Coast From Coast to Coast
Phillida Hargreaves   •  Kingston, Ontario, Canada More Info
The line between urban and rural is becoming increasingly blurred. This is evident when thinking about digital communication. Once you start looking for them, cell phone towers are everywhere.
But It Is a Dry Heat But It Is a Dry Heat
Georgia Heller   •  Scottsdale, Arizona, USA More Info
The saguaro cactus is unique to the Sonoran Desert and thrives in the 100+ degree heat. The vertical lines direct your eyes to the sky. Its arms reach up to touch the heat of the sun.  
Flourish Flourish
Susan Hotchkis   •  Guernsey, Guernsey Channel Islands, UK More Info
NFSThe original photograph that inspired this piece was taken in the old town section of Goa, India. Soft grasses grew high up a wall on a ledge, finding a way to survive. The delicate nature of the grasses sharply contrasted with the hard concrete black and grey wall, the surface of which was being transformed, stained bynature, creating a transient abstract patina.  
Rift Valley Rift Valley
Laura Jaszkowski   •  Eugene, Oregon, USA More Info
Although I live in the city, it is vast, open spaces of land that truly inspire me. Undeveloped and untouched landmakes me think about how our earth looked to earlier inhabitants. As time passes and these vistas disappear, they seem even more precious. I like to imagine what people long before me felt when they first saw the same landscape. There are still some places on ▶
Negev View 3 Negev View 3
Bella Kaplan   •  Kfar-Giladi, Israel More Info
The south part of Israel is the Negev. This area is a desert. There are mountains, small rivers, craters, and very little population. I love this area very much. My quilt describes one part of the Negev — the Ramon Crater. This crater has colorful layers of rocks, many cracked stones, and a lot of dry plants. In the last few months, the Israeli government has made ▶
End of an Era End of an Era
Patricia Kennedy-Zafred   •  Murrysville, Pennsylvania, USA More Info
The agricultural landscape of rural America has changed dramatically since 1900, when nearly half of the U.S.population lived and worked on farms. That number is now just two percent, and more than one-third of today’s farmers are over the age of 65. Every week, faced with economic hardship, long hours, and corporate competition, hundreds of farmers leave their land ▶
Where the sidewalk ends Where the sidewalk ends
Jill Kerttula   •  Charlottesville, Virginia, USA More Info
This whole cloth quilt is made with custom fabric printed with my original photography of the sidewalk by my urban home. It includes leaves (photo imaged, actual, and stitched), found objects (found on the same sidewalk), and both hand and machine stitching. The quilting brings out the actual and the artistically interpreted textures of the concrete and the detritus found ▶
Wild Grasses Wild Grasses
Pat Kroth   •  Verona, Wisconsin, USA More Info
Grass will grow wherever and whenever possible: in a field, a park, a garden, or through the cracks in pavement. Its persistent nature indicates its tenacity and strength even in adverse conditions.
Root & Branch Root & Branch
Jennifer Hammond Landau   •  San Francisco, California, USA More Info
Natural and human-made systems are positioned side-by-side, one grounded in the concrete grid and the other in topographic meandering. Peel away the outer layer of urban structures and peek beneath the streets. There is a branching infrastructure of pipe and wire that maintains human life, just as roots and branches sustain trees in the natural landscape. Roots may curve ▶
Cityscape Cityscape
Susan Lane   •  Vallejo, California, USA More Info
NFSThis original abstract design represents how I feel when I’m standing in the business district of big city, each building competing for my attention. The buildings dominate and are fabulous. They speak of the power of the human mind to dream and build magnificent architecture. The abstract patterns and overlapping angles excite me.
Across the Street from the Bittern Building Across the Street from the Bittern Building
Sheryl LeBlanc   •  Eugene, Oregon, USA More Info
The Bittern Building is an imaginary “low rise” situated near the foot of a mountain range bordering a plains state. While part of a cityscape, it promotes the wildness of its namesake, the secretive American Bittern. 
Ozymandias Ozymandias
Aurelle Locke   •  West Granby, Connecticut, USA More Info
This piece was inspired by a poem of the same name by Percy Bysshe Shelley about a statue of a mighty king which fell into ruin. Here the grasses are overtaking a fallen mighty concrete building and reclaiming the land.
In the Clouds In the Clouds
Joanna Mack   •  Akron, Ohio, USA More Info
NFSIf you look straight up in big cities, you can see the sky even when you’re surrounded by the skyscrapers. Sometimes the buildings help you see the clouds, a happy accident. 
Yield to Nature Yield to Nature
Melanie Marr   •  Houston, Texas, USA More Info
The inspiration for Yield to Nature was a summer drive into town that I took with my daughter to drop her off at music camp. I saw these blackbirds on the yield sign near the freeway.  
River Flow River Flow
Alicia Merrett   •  Wells, Somerset, UK More Info
This is an imaginary map inspired by the rivers of Somerset, England, the county where I live. It is a composite of rivers such as the Avon, the Axe, the Brue, and the Parrett. Their undulating currents flow northwest through a patchwork of fields, and towards the horizon their waters disappear into the Bristol Channel. Grasslands predominate in this aerial view dotted with ▶
Grass Lake Grass Lake
Denise Oyama Miller   •  Fremont, California, USA More Info
One of my favorite spots is a lovely rest area along Highway 97 at about 5000’ elevation, just outside of Weed, California. At one time, it was a lake created by lava flows that blocked a drainage path on the east side of the valley. There was a hotel on the same site as the rest area. In the early 20th century, a development project inadvertently broke through the ▶
Monument for Humanity Monument for Humanity
Dolores Miller   •  San Jose, California, USA More Info
La Grande Arche de la Fraternité, the westernmost element of the Triumphal Way in Paris, was inaugurated in 1989. Rather than glorifying military victories (as does the Arc de Triomphe de l’Etoile), the hollow cubic structure with its grand staircase was designed to express humanitarian ideals and aspirations.
Sparrows in the Meadow Sparrows in the Meadow
Melody Money   •  Boulder, Colorado, USA More Info
This piece was inspired by a lush meadow near my home. The windswept grasses in this rainy early summer were a sight to behold. The way the birds swooped in and out of the grasses seemed like a celebration. I tried to capture the many colors of the grasses and how the light reflected on each blade. This piece is about the joy in that moment.
In the Shadow of Third Avenue In the Shadow of Third Avenue
Jeannie Moore   •  Escondido, California, USA More Info
This piece was designed to explore the hard lines of urban structures. The place is New York, and the year is 1940, in the shadow of the Third Avenue elevated subway traintracks.
Fracked Fracked
Madalene Murphy   •  Amesbury, Massachusetts, USA More Info
Until 2014, I lived in a rural part of Pennsylvania where hundreds of gas wells, three within earshot of my home, have been drilled and fracked. The beauty of the quiet rural landscape has been seriously impacted by this sudden industrial invasion, bringing jobs and money, but also noise, dust, pollution, and questions about the costs of fossil fuels. 
Room with a View 1 Room with a View 1
Geri Patterson-Kutras   •  Morgan Hill, California, USA More Info
We create urban environments not only to provide shelter, but also to satisfy economic mandates, neglecting our natural world and limited resources. Power lines march across the landscape delivering the electricity to light the cities and power industries. Our homes are built shoulder to shoulder on concrete slabs, ignoring the fragility of the earth below. My work explores ▶
300 Bushels Per Acre 300 Bushels Per Acre
Pamela Pilcher   •  Portland, Oregon, USA More Info
Mid-century American agricultural policies promoted “fencerow to fencerow” farming and the goal of 300 bushels per acre. Agriculture moved from small, diversified family farms to large single crop factories. As livestock was phased out, the fences and wildlife habitat disappeared too. Maize, the humble grain cultivated by indigenous peoples for centuries, was ▶
The King`s Wardrobe Was Here The King`s Wardrobe Was Here
Marika Pineda   •  Eugene, Oregon, USA More Info
I became interested in old maps of London while researching family history. The earliest maps showed the initial marks of humanity on the raw landscape as neighborhoods grew along natural features. Housing became denser along the river, gradually spreading into adjacent fields and wilder areas. This piece takes its name from one of the voids in the city left by the great ▶
Surveyed, Sold, Fenced Surveyed, Sold, Fenced
Deborah Runnels   •  Klamath Falls, Oregon, USA More Info
Ownership of land, a premise unknown to the Native Americans, was a driving force for the pioneers. The land was sold, parceled, subdivided, built upon, and fenced. The only freely moving elements are the birds, butterflies, and the wind.
Pavement Patterns, Dancing Light, var. 4 Pavement Patterns, Dancing Light, var. 4
Barbara Schneider   •  Woodstock, Illinois, USA More Info
I think we usually tend to look up at the urban landscape, but I like all the markings and textures that you see at your feet while walking through the city. Pavement Patterns, Dancing Light, var. 4 explores the strong graphics and abstract designs created by light passing through a screen and shining onto pavement.
Plenary Plains, Purposefully Plowed, Perfectly Planned Plenary Plains, Purposefully Plowed, Perfectly Planned
Anne Severn   •  Loveland, Colorado, USA More Info
This piece was influenced by my time in Denver and the open spaces of eastern Colorado. The plains stretchingeast from the Rocky Mountains once were a vast, pristine grassland, a naturally productive ecosystem. During the past 150 years, human settlers have permanently altered this delicate community, culminating in our building of concrete towers where many work and live. ▶
Village in Summer Village in Summer
Maria Simonsson   •  Takoma Park, Maryland, USA More Info
First came the village seen in winter. I loved stitching it and kept thinking that it needed a companion piece. It became the same village, seen in the full bloom of summer. Lots of stitches...
Clover and a Bee Clover and a Bee
Virginia Spiegel   •  Byron, Illinois, USA More Info
I’m inspired by my local prairie reserve —a place I visit often to walk, photograph, and perhaps indulge in a bit of revery. To  make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee, One clover, and a bee, And revery. The revery alone will do, If bees are few. - Emily Dickinson
Alternative Energy -vs- Fossil Fuels #6 Alternative Energy -vs- Fossil Fuels #6
Cynthia St. Charles   •  Billings, Montana, USA More Info
As a native Montanan, I am acutely aware of the controversial impact of local energy-generating activities. My work explores the impact of energy development on the Montana landscape. 
New Chicago New Chicago
Linda Strowbridge   •  Owings Mills, Maryland, USA More Info
Moving from tranquil Nova Scotia to the heart of Chicago a few years ago, I felt like I had been catapulted into another world. There were crowds, grit, and noise. But there was also architecture — captivating, diverse, boundless architecture. I walked the city, soaking up the features of historic buildings, modern structures, industrial sites, homes with character, ▶
Prairie Scape Prairie Scape
Catherine Timm   •  Westmeath, Ontario, Canada More Info
A photograph taken by Clayton Rollins, of the rolling plains in southern Saskatchewan, moved me to create a linear collage to communicate my interpretation of flat plains and deep gullies in the landscape. By using a simple color palette and quilting the plains in straight lines, I was able to emphasize the feeling of flatness. 
80 - 8th Avenue 80 - 8th Avenue
K. Velis Turan   •  Earlton, New York, USA More Info
This building caught my eye like a big wedding cake — built with multiple layers, angles and festoons of concrete and stone.  This study in light and shadows is a view looking north from a rooftop in Manhattan's West Village.
City Scape 1 City Scape 1
Jo Van Loo   •  Phoenix, Arizona, USA More Info
This was the first in a series of cityscapes. I mixed the starkness of the buildings with color splash swishes. 
Snow in the Desert Snow in the Desert
Carolyn Villars   •  Apple Valley, California, USA More Info
NFSOne of the more rare sights in our California desert is snowfall. I wanted to capture this splendid day, as it may be years before I again see snow mounded like this on Joshua Trees and Yuccas.
No Tall Trees No Tall Trees
Mary Williams   •  Summertown, South Australia, Australia More Info
NFSI live in a rural environment in South Australia, which is often described as the “driest state in the driest continent.” As a consequence, there were no tall trees available for use in carrying electricity cables. Stobie poles (named for their inventor J. C. Stobie) were constructed from concrete and steel for this purpose. They are now as familiar throughout ▶
Resilience Resilience
Janet Windsor   •  Tucson, Arizona, USA More Info
When you look closely at everyday things, there is often beauty to be found. No matter how much we try to subdue nature, she still comes shining through.  
Little Houses in a Row, Where Did All the Poppies Go? Little Houses in a Row, Where Did All the Poppies Go?
Marie Murphy Wolfe   •  Vancouver, Washington, USA More Info
Living in suburbia makes me aware daily of the lovely farms and fields of wildflowers that are lost to new construction and “growth.” I understand the need for commerce and housing. I am part of the problem, but still I mourn the loss of the quiet and open spaces, the memory of a time lost forever.
Development Development
Kathy York   •  Austin, Texas, USA More Info
The rapid construction of housing developments changes the landscape, providing homes for many people and significantly altering the habitats of many animals. Will humans be a mere blip, like a daily newspaper, compared to geologic time?


 

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